Month: March 2016

 

THE BIKE RIDE

Reailty Show-Up to 4K

Bike Ride

Histotech-final

Learn Cuisine Commercial

Portfolio Reel

The Histotech – Project Kickstarter/Indiegogo

Project Title:

The Histotech – Project Kickstarter/Indiegogo

 

Target Audience:

Medical industry technicians and young regular adults 20s to 50s along that age group.

 

Subject matter:  Workplace bullying in the medical industry. A professional lab technician who deals with problem co-workers.

  • Million Dollar Baby
  • Who would be most interested in the subject matter of your film? Beyond the obvious main subject of the film, what are different ways to frame your project that might appeal to some other group or demographic?
  • Let’s look at an example: Million Dollar Baby is a boxing film. Or we can expand the scope by framing the story as being about a female boxer or a female athlete. Or the film can be described as being about the bond between a young woman and a father figure, or perhaps about a man’s second chance at redeeming his own life. It is all the same film, but by describing it in different ways, you can tap into different audiences.
  • Message or tone: Sadly, workplace bullying is not just limited to boss-subordinate. It is also takes place between two co-workers. It is an issue that does not get much press attention or awareness until it is completely too late when it turns into workplace violence. The main issues with workplace bullying are the perpetrator wants control over the other person emotional, psychologically, and sometimes physically. This film will show how the main character put together an action plan to fight back.

 

  • No Country for Old Men
  • If your project has a specific message, it should appeal to a like-minded audience. If the message is attached to an activist cause, then the audience can be addressed more directly. Even without an inherent activist cause, a positive message can still frame the discussion of the movie itself. Even without a strong message, the film’s tone—whether serious or sentimental, romantic or ridiculous—can also be used to unite and attract an audience.
  • For example, with its message of a hopeless world full of corruption and cynicism, it is hard to rally behind the bleakness of the film No Country for Old Men. Yet there are many fans of serious drama, as well as fans of gritty westerns. For those who like to be challenged or provoked in their entertainment, this film fits the bill.
  • Not all films will speak to everybody, nor should they. But by understanding the types of people who are drawn to the message or tone of your particular film, you can more effectively target your discussions and outreach efforts.
  • Setting: Northwestern Memorial Hospital located in downtown Chicago, Illinois. It is the primary teaching hospital for Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

 

  • The Great Gatsby
  • The setting of a film can also play a role in capturing interest. A specific region would likely appeal to those with a connection to that area, and exotic regions (including fictional places, such as outer space) can help capture an audience’s imagination. But settings do not have to be restricted to physical places. A setting may also be defined as a period in time (the prehistoric era in The Croods), a group of people (Greek immigrants in My Big Fat Greek Wedding), or a psychological state (the world of schizophrenia in A Beautiful Mind).
  • The setting for each of these movies, or any movie for that matter, may be described in different ways and shaped to suit the fan base being targeted. The physical setting of Baz Luhrmann’s film The Great Gatsby is Long Island, New York. It also takes place during the time period of the 1920s, and it is set in the world of elite high society. All three of these are different settings that can be separately exploited to shape the discussions surrounding the film.
  • Characters: Medical scientists in their middle 30s male and female.

 

  • The Princess and the Frog (left), Brave (right)
  • The types of people represented within a film can also be used to find an audience. This can be taken literally, such as a movie about doctors would interest those working in the medical field. But it can also be viewed as referring to what the people in the film might represent. One may not associate with lower-class Mafia killers, for example, but one can relate to the struggles of those trying to balance work with the needs of family—which, despite their extreme and dramatic situations, is part of the appeal behind such works as The Godfather, GoodFellas, and The Sopranos.
  • In a more recent example, the Disney film Brave found much of its appeal from the strength of its main character, Princess Merida. Being headstrong and rebellious makes her instantly relatable, as does the idea of an ordinary girl who yearns to be free from her restrictive mother and society. This is especially resonant for its targeted younger demographic. On a more superficial note, the fact that Merida was a redhead could also be marketed, much like Disney did with their first African-American princess in their previous film, The Princess and the Frog.
  • With any film, consider not just the specific characters that can be showcased, but the individual aspects within those characters as well. This could reflect race, religion, profession, class, age range, or a host of any defining traits.
  • People and partners. This will be with Celebrities & other brand partnerships. I do not have any connection into getting to the selling point but this would be one of the talking points to add in the Kickstarter campaign.

 

  • Aaron Ralston (left)127 Hours (right)
  • Another marketable aspect of a film are the people involved in making it. If there is a high-profile cast and crew attached to a project, their names can—and should—be marketed. But even on a smaller scale, a film’s associations with individuals or strategic partners can foster both credibility and promotional opportunities.
  • The film 127 Hours represents how people and partners can expand the discussion of a project. The film, which was a dramatic account of a real-life incident in which a hiker was trapped alone in a canyon under dire circumstances, was marketed on the strength of its director, Danny Boyle, and star, James Franco. The marketing also highlighted the history of the real-life Aaron Ralston, whom James Franco portrayed in the film.
  • Beyond the film itself, the film had promotional partners, primarily companies involved in outdoor adventure, such as Camelbak, Eddie Bauer, Sierra Designs, and Larabar. Any one of these people or companies have interests of their own, as do their fans and customers. Speaking to those interests, rather than the film itself, creates a greater scope for the discussion.
  • Genre elements: Drama, Thriller, Comedy

 

  • Sex and the City (left), The Expendables (right)
  • While it is helpful for a movie to be seen as a genre film, it would be a mistake to assume that simply being part of a genre is enough to warrant greater interest in the film itself. Genres do help to classify and provide a set of expectations for a film, but a savvy producer will know not just to appeal to the genre’s fan base, but to do so by showcasing the specific elements that satisfy their tastes.
  • When marketing the action film The Expendables, for example, not much attention was paid to highlighting its story or characters. The focus was squarely on its action elements—the guns, explosions, stunts, wisecracks, and tough-guy attitude. Similarly, when marketing a romantic comedy like Sex and the City, the fashion, bustling city life, and sentimental emotions are highlighted more than any specific situation or theme.
  • Production methods : This film will be shot on a low-budget with Red one Digital cinema camera. Production will consist of a crew of ten people and will be in production for 18 days in four locations one will be in Michigan and the other city of Chicago. The rest of the film will get at Michigan Motion Picture Studios.